More jobs lost in Saskatchewan despite national job growth

Today’s, Statistics Canada numbers show that nearly 11,000 fewer people are working in Saskatchewan compared to the same time last year, including 4,200 job losses in just the last month. More troubling is that almost all of the jobs lost were full-time positions.

“Whether it’s getting rid of 16 deputy sheriffs in Saskatchewan courtrooms, or cutting post-secondary education programs like NORTEP and NORPAC, the Sask. Party’s approach to creating and sustaining jobs in the province has been deeper cuts and further layoffs. It’s completely backwards,” said NDP Leader Trent Wotherspoon. “The Premier should be working constructively to diversify and grow Saskatchewan’s economy. Instead, he’s picking fights and throwing Twitter tantrums while people are losing good, mortgage-paying jobs.”

Saskatchewan’s job losses and rising unemployment rate were in contrast to job growth in several other provinces, including Alberta, where 9,000 jobs were created between September and October.

“While other provinces are stepping up and creating new jobs, the Sask. Party’s approach has resulted in more and more Saskatchewan people being out of work,” said Wotherspoon.

Despite continued promises from the government to move toward reconciliation, First Nations unemployment continues to sit at close to 20% and is much worse on reserve.

“We simply haven’t seen willingness from the Sask. Party to properly address this troubling trend in Saskatchewan,” Wotherspoon said.

Several sectors that are vital to the growth and sustainability of Saskatchewan’s economy were among the hardest hit. They include:

  • Agriculture lost 4,900 jobs year over year;
  • Construction lost 7,700 job years over year and;
  • 4,400 fewer jobs are being held by people between the ages of 15-24

“Lately, the Sask. Party’s focus has been on defending themselves against scandals, standing up for their big out-of-province donors, and finding new ways to sell off our Crowns and sell-out Saskatchewan workers,” said Wotherspoon. “To turn this situation around, we need to work together to build our economy together. It’s the only way we’ll be able to help the many people of the province who are struggling to keep or find a job.”